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Stress: Work related stress due to bullying in the workplace

Stress related to bullying in the workplace

Here we address the issue of Work Related Stress and talk you through causes, effect and action you can take to reduce the risk of negative stress. This is a particularly interesting issue as over 70% of employee calls to our helpline have already been signed off work with Work Related Stress by their GP.

 

In some cases, callers have been off work for months and months and risk dismissal on grounds of ‘Capability Due to Ill Health’. Don’t wait until you are so ill you cannot see a way forward. Call us if you need help. At some point in our working lives we have all probably felt stressed about a project, target or circumstance that’s out of our control. It might have been the potential outcome of a situation is perceived to be a threat to your job or reputation within the business.

 

Stress can affect us all differently and no one is immune to feeling stressed, it can all depend on the person and their ability to perform under pressure. It certainly does not imply weakness. In fact it’s a fundamental part of our survival instincts that makes us human. Stress is a physical response by the brain to danger.

 

Unfortunately, prolonged exposure to stress related to bullying at work can have serious consequences on our body and mind. There are a number of recognised illnesses that are associated with stress or are forms of stress, including PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) and PTED (Post Traumatic Embitterment Disorder) and Depression.

 

The physical and mental impact on our lives due to bullying related stress can affect our behaviour and relationships at home and work. It can also have an impact on our ability to do our job. Stress is one on the biggest contributors to long term sick leave in the UK with over half a million workers citing stress, depression or anxiety as a factor to their absence in the last year. If you are suffering with a stress related condition or you think that you might be stressed. These are some of the signs to look out for.

Thomson Local blog, The Top Ten Tips for employers to reduce organisational stress

Ten top tips for employers to reduce organisational stress

Stress can prove a major headache for firms, leading to misunderstandings and getting in the way of productivity.

 

Here we advise employers how to reduce stress in the workplace. Nobody’s perfect, we all have too much pressure from time to time, and stress can affect anyone given an accumulation of circumstances...

More Information

What are the symptoms of stress

These are some of the symptoms and signs consistent with stress. Stress can have a physical and emotional impact on your body and stress related to bullying at work is one of the most common causes of stress in the workplace.

Excessive and constant tiredness

listlessness, exhaustion or fatigue.

Erratic anger and frustration

A drop in productivity

Aches and pains of the body

Headaches & migraine

Loss of stamina and strength.

Palpitations and breathlessness.

Excessive perspiration or Sweating

Nightmares & Night Terrors.

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Feeling of helplessness.

Loss of confidence

Feeling overly emotional

Grumpy and irritable

Feelings of anxiousness & despair.

Feeling hopeless & out of control.

More forgetful than usual

A lack of motivation

Feel low of depressed

Inability to see a future.

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Flashbacks which are work related.

Loss of appetite.

Rapid weight gain or loss

Loss of sex drive and libido.

Upset stomach & butterflies

Physical sickness.

Irritable bowel syndrome

Stomach cramp & stomach pain.

diarrhoea or constipation

Angina, heart attack, panic attack.

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Do you have Post Traumatic Embitterment Disorder (PTED)

Are you feeling helpless or distressed? Are you angry or frustrated? Has your doctor signed you off work with Work Related Stress, Anxiety or Depression recently or in the past? Is the cost of your depression, frustration and anger impacting on your home life and your general wellbeing? Do you feel unable to move on with your life as a result of something traumatic that happened to you at work?

 

We believe the word ‘stress’ does not adequately describe the condition of an employee signed off by a GP, for example, with Work Related Stress. Some say ‘stress’ is a positive thing which we can all use to our advantage by channelling it in a positive manner. Of course this is true – but stress can be extremely negative and lead to depression and to far more serious, life changing, health issues.

 

There is a new disorder being diagnosed in the USA in relation to workplace harassment and bullying: It is called Post

Traumatic Embitterment Disorder. With PTED the person suffering can no longer trust anyone around him/her and the traumain essence consumes them with a profound “bitterness” making the victim incapable of moving on from the incident. We believe quite a few people are entrapped in their trauma and have been for years.

 

Signs that you could be suffering with PTED are, feel helpless, angry, frustrated or unable to recover from something that happened in the past. We believe this feeling of helplessness and embitterment falls into the PTED category and below you will find an article that explains what PTED is.

a girl suffering with Post Traumatic Embitterment Disorder

What can you do about stress?

There is a lot you can do. You are the only one who can bring about change in this situation.  Consider your options and strategise your case before you make a life-changing decision. Insure you are informed of your rights and your options before you act.  Do not resign you position,  call us first.  Here are a few simple, strategic, steps you can take

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Start to keep a diary.  Keep it at home. Write down examples of the bullying keeping it factual and brief.

You’re not writing a book. You are keeping a diary.  Include date, time, names of witnesses and a brief summary.

 

Collate hard copies of the Company policies.  Grievance Policy. Bullying & Harassment Policy and other relevant policies ie: Performance Management, Maternity, Flexible Working and Absence Management.

 

Open a folder.  Keep at home and start to structure your case.   Your case is about the written word, not the spoken word so ensure everything is documented and placed in your folder.  Sections in your folder will likely include (not exclusively); Policies & Contract of Employment, Diary, Health (ie: Sick Certificate), Witnesses, Evidence, Sources of Information, Appraisals, Emails and Correspondence, Minutes of Meetings, File Notes, Personal Achievements, Advice sought and research material etc.

 

Call our Helpline or seek legal advice regarding your rights.

 

Draw up and submit a Stage 1 Grievance or respond in writing to any formal process you are being put through.  If you meet with management but no minutes are taken, follow the meeting up with an email confirming what was said and agreed. Put it in your folder.

These simple steps, above, will help you to feel more in control as you embark on formal processes.  Call our helpline for further advice or follow the policies and procedures laid down by your employer. A good source of information regarding your employment rights can be found on the ACAS website.

What is Stress?

Stress can be likened to an ‘out of body’ experience where you cease to function normally, or think rationally, due to feelings of confusion, hurt, anger, frustration and despair caused by the actions of another person. Some say stress is good for you but where it is attributed to the negative behaviour of an individual, or employer, and where that treatment impacts negatively on your health, it is quite the opposite. If left, the distress turns to a level of stress that can become deep-routed and harmful long term.

 

It is a mental health condition. It constitutes injury if it can be proven that the injury  (ie: the stress) has been caused by the actions of others – or by a failure to act, in cases where an employer fails to investigate matters but ‘knew or reasonably ought to have known’ that the treatment was potentially harmful.

 

(Definition by Christine Pratt, Founder of NBH).

What is PTED? (Post Traumatic Embitterment Disorder)

PTED is a proposed disorder modelled after Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Some psychiatrists are proposing this as a mental disorder because they believe there are people who have become so bitter they can barely function. PTED patients might not fit the formal criteria for PTSD and can be clinically distinguished from it, prompting the description of a new and separate disorder.

 

A German psychiatrist, Michael Linden, has done some ground-breaking research into this condition and describes its effect on people: “They feel the world has treated them unfairly. It’s one step more complex than anger. They’re angry plus helpless.” He says that people with the disorder are almost treatment resistant and that; These people usually don’t come to treatment, or do not respond well to treatment and/or mediation because they believe the world has to change, not them. This may be one reason (of many perhaps) why mediation is not always successful in conflict cases. He believes that 1% to 2% of people are affected at any given time, and explains that, although sufferers of the disorder tend to have a desire for vengeance, “…revenge is not a treatment.

 

We believe the statistics are far higher. This behaviour is so common — and so deeply destructive – that some psychiatrists are urging it be more widely identified and acknowledged as a mental illness under the name post-traumatic embitterment disorder. Embittered people are typically good people who have worked hard at something important, such as a job, relationship or activity. When something unexpectedly awful happens — they don’t get the promotion, their spouse files for divorce or they fail to make the Olympic team — a profound sense of injustice overtakes them. Instead of dealing with the loss with the help of family and friends, they cannot let go of the feeling of being victimized. Almost immediately after the traumatic event, they become angry, pessimistic, aggressive, hopeless haters.

 

This very severe emotional reaction can become ‘all consuming’ and negative. The degree of reaction varies.

If any of this sounds familiar, we would like to hear from you.

Call us on: 0845 22 55 787

Testimony from caller diagnosed with Work Related Stress

Testimony from caller diagnosed with Work Related Stress: dated July 2018: Just a quick email to say thank you for your advice and support and offer of help with grievance etc when I phoned the bullying helpline recently. My GP was concerned about my failing health, brought on by the hostile environment my current manager has created for me.  I had to take notice of my GP advice which was “no job is worth making you ill. You’re on the way to a serious attack” .   Thanks again for your help.  Your organisations is doing a great job – helping people to move forward away from their bullying circumstance – to a better more peaceful existence.

July 2018:

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* Call Charges: 0845 calls are charged at circa 7p per minute plus your telecom providers access charges. We do not receive revenue from inbound calls and nor do we profit from calls.